No landscape can be comprehended until we ask not only who uses the space, but also how it was created and how it has changed. Revolving around intersections of land, culture, and ideology to facilitate conversations about place making, The Green Book documents often unrecognized but historically significant urban sites from Atlanta to Chicago. 

Chicago and Atlanta were principal destinations during the Great Migrations. This pathway carries a history and culture while also speaking specifically to urban landscape. Place cannot be isolated from narrative and the overlapping histories between the North (Chicago) and South (Atlanta) expose the shifting relationships between place and people. 

I travel to towns and cities between Atlanta and Chicago to make photographs illustrating historical and present-day migration. The trip follows the route suggested by The Negro Motorist Green Book and focuses on sites where businesses once stood guaranteeing safe passage. The book was an annual guidebook for non-white and/or non-Christian road travelers. 

The final, multi-media approach to the project will honor the stories and sites found with The Green Book and along the Atlanta - Chicago route. Our present-day urban space was created by the replacement of some people and the displacement of others. The Green Book maps visible and the invisible narratives across the nation by focusing on the spaces and people in-between.

A PROJECT FUNDED BY A 2017 PROJECT GRANT FROM THE LUMINARTS CULTURAL FOUNDATION AT THE UNION CLUB OF CHICAGO.